When it comes to legal contracts, many people assume that signatures are a requirement for them to be valid. However, the truth is that a contract does not necessarily have to be signed to be legally binding.

In fact, a contract can be formed simply through an exchange of emails or verbal agreement between two parties. This is known as a verbal contract or an implied contract, and it is just as enforceable under the law as a written contract.

That being said, having a written contract with signatures does provide a clear record of the agreement and can make it easier to enforce in court if there are any disputes. It also helps to avoid confusion or misunderstandings that can arise in verbal agreements.

So, why do we often associate contracts with signatures? The answer lies in the fact that signatures serve as evidence of agreement. They show that both parties have read, understood, and agreed to the terms of the contract. In addition, signatures provide a level of formality and professionalism that can make a contract feel more official.

However, it is important to note that a lack of signature does not necessarily invalidate a contract. As long as both parties have clearly expressed their intention to enter into a contract and have agreed to the terms, the contract can still be legally binding.

It is worth noting, however, that certain types of contracts do require signatures in order to be enforceable. For example, contracts related to real estate, marriage, or the sale of goods over a certain amount may require signatures under state or federal law.

In summary, while signatures are often associated with legal contracts, they are not always necessary for a contract to be legally binding. As long as both parties have clearly expressed their intention to enter into an agreement and have agreed to the terms, a contract can be formed without signatures. However, having a written or signed contract can make it easier to enforce the agreement if necessary and can provide a clearer record of the agreement.